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20121129
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is the question of the tax cuts expiring. and for the obama administration, the question is, is it in their interest to trade tax cuts for the wealthy? increase for the wealthy for raising the age for eligibility for medicare, for example. i'm not sure that that's a trade that they are eager to make immediately. >> let me show you the side by side comparison. the president wants $1.6 trillion in revenue and republicans want to cap the same deductions for the rich but republicans want to change the age to 67 and change the way they calculate social security payments. i wonder, though, when we look at these numbers, are we that far apart in. >> i think they are definitely rather far aare part at this moment in time. yeah, absolutely. >> so there are so many ways that any of this could affect the average tack payer, obviously if taxes go up. but what about funding to states and localities. i know that one of the things that they are concerned about is that when you make cuts, that essentially those cuts are going to come on their budgets. what could happen in a meeting like thi
romney agreed with obama, that taxes on the high-income folks had to go up. so the challenge on the republican side, and it is tough, is folks like kevin mccarthy did get elected. and in his district, his no-tax pledge worked for him. these guys are in a very tough spot because they know at the end of the day they're going to have to raise these taxes. but doing so will cause an immense amount of political pain. that's why in my view, it's probably likely that we won't get a deal before january 1st. but on january 3rd, the senate sends a bill over. where now we're voting on a bill to lower taxes. the norquist pledge becomes irrelevant. in fact, they comply with the norquist pledge by voting for a bill that would provide tax relief for 98% of americans. so i just think this is a very difficult political situation on the republican side. you know, the speaker clearly knows that revenues have to go up. and he doesn't have the leverage now. and we're back into brinksmanship politics. but bottom line, the cliff is really much more a slope, and we can act on this ideally before jan
maker? >> it just may mean that republicans ultimately give him close to what he wants on raising tax rates on the top 2%. president obama has been very clear, he was all the way through the campaign that he would not give in on that. so that's i think what's important now. republicans don't like a lot of what was in the white house's opening offer. they dictate the $50 billion stimulus that was in the offer as a slap in the face. some of these little things we'll see taken out of file deal. >> to that point here's john boehner talking about when he saw that opening offer. >> i was flabbergasted. i looked at him and said you can't be serious. i just never seen anything like it. you know, we got seven weeks between election day and the end the year. and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. >> okay. >> it's clear he's not pleased from his ha. is the president in danger of going too far? >> no. i think that everyone is amazed that president obama is pursuing an absolutely normal approach to negotiation. people over the last two years got so accustomed to his strategy
on tax hikes for the wealthy, this following president obama and speaker boehner's first phone call in days with both sides staying mum on the details. this afternoon president obama's fiscal photo-op off the day takes him to the suburban home of a middle class families in virginia, one of the thousands who responded to the
on tax hikes for the wealthy, this following president obama and speaker boehner's first phone
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5